Recruiting Essay: Further Thoughts

In my essay, Are Recruiters Inhibiting Recruiting?, I pulled together some personal experiences to form an opinion about where things were, and were going, in the recruiting industry.  Let me emphasize this, as apparently this concept didn’t come through: these were my opinions based on my personal observations.  Let me also emphasize that my intent had not been to slam, in any way, a specific recruiter, or indict the recruiting industry in general.  Rather, I have been thinking about the apparent disconnect between the hordes of people looking for work, employers who say they can’t find the right people, and had what I believed was a “Eureka moment” as to one possible cause… and wrote about it.

Apparently my essay was, however, perceived as putting down the industry.  Again I repeat: my intent had not been to denigrate the industry or any specific individual.  Since the perception was, however, that I was doing so – apparently to the point that one commenter wanted to convince me that recruiters were not, and I quote, “the Devil incarnate” – I apologize.

In my contacts are any number of recruiters; several have become regular correspondents.  One has, over time, become something of a friend and sounding board.  I have been placed into several jobs by recruiters, and absolutely see them as aids and helpers in matching people looking for work with companies looking for people.

There will be more on this: I have gotten a LOT of information from a few different recruiters, and after I’ve assimilated it all will definitely write another essay.  On the flip side, though, I’ve received a number of emails from job seekers who do see a similar pattern to what I’d initially observed.  So the mix of information – after digestion and thought – should be interesting.

 

© 2014, David Hunt, PE

7 thoughts on “Recruiting Essay: Further Thoughts

  1. Wow! I’ve been a technical recruiter for over 25 years and have never “met” anyone actively looking for work who is so out of touch with what the job market is. I think perhaps that all of your negative and disparaging comments about recruiters stem from that lack of understanding. The reality is that almost every company from large, established firms to small, emerging start-ups are hiring. Recruiters don’t have to “scrounge” around for openings at all! The job market is tight because qualified candidates are so difficult to source. Yes, there are candidates looking for jobs but the highly talented ones are being sought after by multiple sources. In fact, many Boston/ Cambridge companies are offering finder’s fees of up to $35,000 to anyone referring a software engineer / software developer who is hired. My clients come to me for recruiting help because I have a deep network I tap into for referrals and because my reputation for integrity and honesty is well known. My clients consider me a trusted partner, not a necessary evil! Your attitude is one I used to come across often, 20-25 years ago. I had forgotten how negative people could be about the profession I consider myself lucky to be part of.

    Just so you know, I seldom if ever spend the time to respond to any posts but I couldn’t let this one go by the wayside.

    I would be happy to discuss this in detail with you if you really can keep an open mind. Or, feel free to check out my website (although it’s being re-structured right now, you can get an idea of my background): RemarkStaffing.com

    1. Dear Judy:

      >Wow! I’ve been a technical recruiter for over 25 years and have never “met” anyone actively looking for work who is so out of touch with what the job market is.

      In what particular technical domain do you recruit?

      >I think perhaps that all of your negative and disparaging comments about recruiters stem from that lack of understanding.

      ALL of my negative and disparaging comments? Please, pray tell, enlighten me – what was disparaging and negative? Did I say recruiters were unethical? Where? Did I say you were cheats? Where?

      The only thing – IMHO – where I pointed to any specific behavior was when I discussed naming the wrong town… something done by the majority of recruiters contacting me for that specific job I mentioned.

      >The reality is that almost every company from large, established firms to small, emerging start-ups are hiring. Recruiters don’t have to “scrounge” around for openings at all!

      Really? I’m glad to hear it. And again, I pointed to MY EXPERIENCES and voiced MY OPINIONS. Instead of jumping down my throat, all you need to is say so.

      >The job market is tight because qualified candidates are so difficult to source. Yes, there are candidates looking for jobs but the highly talented ones are being sought after by multiple sources.

      NOW you pushed my button. “Qualified candidates” my hindquarters.

      I literally just got off a phone call for a CONTRACT job. Let me emphasize that again – a temporary job. And the recruiter was concerned I might be “too senior” for the role, as the company had “very specific” requirements. Seriously? You’d think a company wanting someone to come in and solve problems – knowing they were there for a given amount of time only – would value experience. Apparently not.

      I have seen job descriptions written so specifically that, it seems, only the person who just left the job could get it. Hiring managers, per a DeVry University poll, do not see the need to compromise one iota on what they want. Take, for example, a job description at a company where I’d LIKE to work.

      Do they want CAD experience? Yes. 5-7 years. I have over that.
      Do they want plastics knowledge? Yes, I have that.
      Knowledge of injection molding tooling? Check. SPC and process controls? Check. Project management skills? Check. Lean manufacturing? Check. Cost reduction? Check. Worked in a “regulated” industry? Checkarooney. Vendor relationships? Checkadoodle. Masters? Checkacockadoodledoo. Team leadership experience… heck, you should be getting the point by now.

      I submitted my resume officially. I networked in. And… NOTHING. No call, no interview, no nothing. In my cover letter I highlighted skills, accomplishments, results, and education that met EVERY SINGLE REQUIREMENT THEY HAVE. If candidates are in such short supply…

      Another position, for which I interviewed over a year ago was open for CLOSE TO TWO YEARS. Per the recruiter – with whom I have a good, solid relationship – they interviewed over TWO DOZEN PEOPLE (in person!) for a plastics design engineer. They ended up closing the role rather than hiring because they couldn’t find someone they all agreed on – I know I could have done the job, I’m sure others could have done the job, but no manager in the interview team wanted to suck it up and take a risk because it’s safer to complain they can’t find anyone.

      >In fact, many Boston/ Cambridge companies are offering finder’s fees of up to $35,000 to anyone referring a software engineer / software developer who is hired.

      In case you noticed, I’m not a software engineer.

      As I’ve mentioned in several of my essays, I attend several groups for people looking for work. These people are educated, experienced, capable… and unemployed. Why? There is a bigotry against people who have lost their jobs. But with 90+ million people out there unemployed, you’re telling me companies can’t find people who, with a class or two, couldn’t be solid performers?

      >My clients come to me for recruiting help because I have a deep network I tap into for referrals and because my reputation for integrity and honesty is well known. My clients consider me a trusted partner, not a necessary evil! Your attitude is one I used to come across often, 20-25 years ago. I had forgotten how negative people could be about the profession I consider myself lucky to be part of.

      I’m glad you have a thriving business and a reputation for integrity and honesty. These are good things…

      >Just so you know, I seldom if ever spend the time to respond to any posts but I couldn’t let this one go by the wayside.

      Why not?

      >I would be happy to discuss this in detail with you if you really can keep an open mind. Or, feel free to check out my website (although it’s being re-structured right now, you can get an idea of my background): RemarkStaffing.com

      I will email you directly as well. I look forward to a discussion. I am certainly open-minded and willing to entertain other opinions. I hope you will do the same, listening to someone on the other side of the equation (and a different industry).

      David

    2. I want to rebut Judy with one link:

      https://www.linkedin.com/today/post/article/20140611130004-20017018-the-worst-hiring-mistake-any-company-can-make

      Read the comments. There are comments upon comments upon comments to the effect that people interview, and don’t even get the courtesy of getting told what the result is.

      If people are coming in to be interviewed they are, at least on the basis of their resume, qualified. No company will waste valuable time on people who don’t at least appear to meet their requirements. If “qualified people” were in such short supply, no company would dare treat the professional community at large this way.

    3. David,

      I would imagine that most people criticizing your posts on recruitment didn’t even bother to read the full article and just skimmed through it.

      Judy’s comment seems geared more towards promoting her services than as a response to your posts.

      I enjoy reading your blog and I hope your job search ends successfully very soon!

      Greetings from Canada.

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